First stop – A farm near Kimberly

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A few weeks before our arrival some abandoned lambs had been found on the farm. They had then been hand reared and had become completely tame, running and bleating at anybody who came near.

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Aside from the traditional cattle, sheep and goats, the farm also sports some game including wildebeest (blue and black), springbuck, ostriches, kudu and gemsbok. Not to mention a couple of cows and even donkeys that think they belong to one of the afore-mentioned groups.

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Apparently these bugs are known as “oog-pisters” on the farm. I’m not sure what the English name is. Apparently they can spray a fluid into your eyes causing them to swell hideously. I managed to catch a couple of them mating – not that it seemed necessary due to their sheer abundance.

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Sandstone Farm

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I have mentioned Sandstone farm previously. It is situated a little way out of Ficksburg and is quite well known for its collection of old tractors and working steam trains. Yesterday I climbed through the fence to photograph some sheep, but quickly jumped back out when the cows with really long horns (a cow is a cow is a cow to me) were herded into the same enclosure. I also took a walk through some of the sheds – Kyle was looking for bees – and took some photos of the old tractors. Apparently there is a lot of history in this pile of rust and people come from all over to see it. At any rate, the tractors make for an interesting subject.